All the Polls Say Majority of Americans Favor Marijuana Legalization

Categories: Marijuana

Make-Marijuana-Legal-300x233.gif
Who will give them what they want?
Gallup, Pew, straw -- whatever poll you take, the result of late is the same: a majority of Americans think marijuana should be legal.

Today's offering is from the Pew Research Center, which has been gauging the public's desire on drug policy since the 1960s. And "for the first time in more than four decades," Pew is recording a majority in favor of ending the war on the magic plant, with 52 percent of our nation's citizens in favor of legalization, to 45 percent still hanging onto Prohibition mentality.

It seems indisputable that legalization is the will of the people. So how are those legalization measures in Congress faring? (Hint: not well).

The Pew poll is consistent with earlier surveys of public opinion, including a Field poll conducted earlier this year and a Gallup poll released in 2011. Add that to a Rasmussen Reports poll done last year, and the message is clear.

Millennials -- that wired generation of whippersnappers between the ages of 18 and 32 for whom the Cold War is a mythical fairy tale -- are driving the result; roughly 65 percent of that population is in favor (which is a pure reversal from 2008, when only 36 percent were in favor -- thank goodness for the Internet attention span). However, all generations are showing attitude shifts on the issue.

For the first time, an even 50 percent of Baby Boomers are in favor of marijuana legalization -- double from 1994, according to the poll. And senior citizens' support has increased from 17 percent in favor to 32 percent.

Across party lines and generation gaps, Americans think that the federal government's law enforcement efforts against marijuana is pointless, with 72 percent responding that eradication efforts "aren't worth the time."

There are remnants of reefer madness among us, though. About 32 percent of the 1,551 respondents say that marijuana is morally wrong, and 51 percent of the country says it'd be uncomfortable if people around them used marijuana.

That said, the tide of public opinion is clearly turning. Will policy be close behind?

"It's time for politicians to catch up to the voters on this issue," said Tom Angell, chairman of the Marijuana Majority. "Not too long ago, it was widely accepted in political circles that elected officials who wanted to get re-elected needed to act 'tough' on drugs and go out of their way to support the continued criminalization of marijuana. The opposite is quickly becoming true."

U.S. Rep. Jared Polis (D-Colorado) introduced a legalization measure in Congress in February. Similar in language to measures introduced by Ron Paul and Barney Frank, the bill is meeting a similar fate: it has not yet been called for a committee hearing or for a vote, which in Washington means it's not going anywhere.

It would seem, however, that avoiding the issue won't be an option much longer.




My Voice Nation Help
5 comments
bootsymae2000
bootsymae2000

I am a nana of 6 . And no i dont smoke weed ,i must say i have in the past..BUT this country is in debt and it could be free of that debt just by making pot legal .And yes i HAVE written the white house about it

1) it would create jobs for many AMERICANS...

2)the prisons would not be over populated

3)we would save millions just by not keeping a person in jail for having weed

4) how many people were killed in car accidents  while smoking  vs  drinking...and  u can stop at any store on the road and buy beer some sell to under age kids ..go ahead drink and drive take a chance on killing someone ..STUPID

5) THERE WOULD BE ALOT OF PEOPLE THAT ARE IN CRONIC PAIN ALL THE TIME WHO COULD LIVE THEIR LIFE A WHOLE LOT EASIER .EVERY DAY I WOULD RATHER SEE SOMEONE SMOKE A JOINT THAN TAKE A HAND FULL OF PILLS 3 TO 4 TIMES A DAY.I KNOW WHAT THATS LIKE CAUSE I HAVE TO DO IT...WE VOTE FOR EVERYTHING ELSE WHY NOT THIS?

Well this is all imma say for NOW

Paul Varga
Paul Varga

Them finding their way to a voting booth is a different story.

malcolmkyle16
malcolmkyle16 topcommenter

Fight Prohibition with Jury Nullification!

When called for jury duty on a case concerning a drug violation with no overt act of violence, do not convict! If the offender is non-violent, do not send them to prison! Another person in a federal or state prison for drugs is not going to make society any better or our families any safer, in fact, it WILL do the exact opposite.

* It only takes one juror to prevent a guilty verdict. 

* You are not lawfully required to disclose your voting intention, ether before or after taking your seat on a jury.

* You are also not required to give a reason to your fellow jurors on your position when voting—simply state that you find the accused not guilty.

* Jurors must understand that it is their opinion, their vote. It is of no consequence If the Judge or the other jurors disapprove; there is no punishment for having a dissenting opinion.

We must create what we can no longer afford to wait for: Please Vote To Acquit!

Now Trending

From the Vault

 

©2014 SF Weekly, LP, All rights reserved.
Loading...