Warriors Coach Mark Jackson Was Allegedly Extorted By a Former Mistress

mark-jackson.jpg
Steph Curry's anke is the least of Mark Jackson's worries right now.
On April 3, a man walked up to Golden State Warriors coach Mark Jackson in a Memphis hotel, according to a criminal complaint filed this week in federal court in Oakland. The Warriors were in town to play the Grizzlies. The man showed Jackson a folder filled with "compromising pictures" of Jackson -- pictures of the Brett Favre/Anthony Weiner/Greg Oden/Monta Ellis variety.

The man also showed him a CD of voice messages that Jackson had sent to a stripper named Alexis Adams. Jackson had had an extramarital affair with Adams six years earlier.

Jackson gave the man $5,000 and tickets to the Warriors-Grizzlies game, and the man gave him the photos and CD, which Jackson then destroyed. Two weeks later, the court filings state, Jackson's wife received an e-mail from tencommandment7@gmail.com:

Now I will ask you only once, do you want to purchase these photos before I sell them? I already know you recognize the attached pictures. There are a plethora of others, even more revealing, as well as phone conversations.

Jackson went to the police.

On Monday, the FBI arrested Marcus Shaw, 40, and Adams, 28, charging them with extortion, a story first reported by The Smoking Gun this morning.

In the court documents Jackson's name is withheld, replaced by "V1." But after the story went public today, he released a statement to CBS Sports, which included:

I recognize the extremely poor judgment that I used both in having an affair six years ago -- including the embarrassing communication I exhibited during that time -- and in attempting to deal with the extortion scheme at first by myself. I made some egregious errors. I apologize for any embarrassment I may have caused my family, friends and, of course, the Warriors.

Jackson, who was hired in June 2011 to coach the Warriors, was a TV analyst for the New Jersey Nets at the time. Adams was a dancer at a gentleman's club in New York. The affair reportedly lasted less than a year. According to an affidavit by FBI Agent Beth Alvarez, provided by TSG:

When [Jackson] made clear he did not plan to leave his wife for Adams, Adams called [Jackson]'s wife and told her about the affair. Adams also sent some of the compromising photographs to [Jackson]'s wife. Despite the revelation of the affair, [Jackson] and his wife remain married today and that the affair occurred and that the compromising photographs exist are not publicly known facts.

During the extortion attempt, which began near the end of the NBA regular season, Jackson and the blackmailers exchanged e-mails and phone calls, under the FBI's watch.

On May 2, tencommandment7@gmail.com (the seventh commandment covers adultery) wrote:

how much are you willing to offer for this information to safeguard yourself from the vultures of teh media? ... Not sure what your [sic] were thinking when you offered me... lunch money in Memphis, is that what your life is worth? That game me indication that you really didn't give it much thought, therefore I emailed your wife. Your words, "you have too much to lose", [sic] I would agree."

Some of the pictures, according to court filings, "were of [Jackson] without any clothing and of [Jackson]'s genitalia."

The next day, the extortionist claims that he has "an offer for $185K from another resource."

The FBI, according to the affidavit, traced the cell phone number and the e-mail IP address to Shaw. Phone records showed this text exchange between Shaw and Adams on April 3, the day of the $5,000 Memphis hotel meeting:

Adams to Shaw, 3:34 p.m.: "Concentrate and fuck him up!he is a Fake ass man of god!"

Shaw to Adams, 5:45 p.m.: "This nigga left me some tickets smh." (Attached was a picture of two Warriors-Grizzlies tickets.)

Jackson and his wife, Desiree Coleman, who have been married for 22 years, serve as co-pastors at True Love Worship Center in Van Nuys, California.

Jackson concluded his statement by saying,

At that time in my life, I was not pastoring. Three years ago, my wife and I established a ministry. With deepest regret, I want to apologize to my Church Family.

I was wrong. We must live holy.

Jackson played 17 years in the NBA, most notably with the Indiana Pacers and New york Knicks.

The Warriors also released a statement that explained:

Jackson informed the Warriors of the extortion scheme in late April -- three weeks after his first encounter with the extortionist -- and solicited help from the organization. At that point, Jackson and the Warriors immediately contacted the Federal Bureau of Investigation.
Although not condoning his previous actions that led to the extortion attempt, the Warriors fully support Coach Jackson during this time and thank law enforcement authorities and the FBI for their prompt assistance in helping Coach Jackson and his family.

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