Watch These S.F. Cops on Bikes Roll Through a Stop Sign

Categories: Law & Order, bikes
It's always fun to bust a cop -- even thought there's really nothing you can do about it. But it's also frustrating to see our men (and women) in blue break the laws they are cracking on us.

As noted by the Uptown Almanac, local cyclist Amy Farah Weiss was particularly pissy over this video she caught, which shows two San Francisco cops on bikes rolling through a stop sign in the Haight, rather than coming to a complete stop.

It gets even better when Weiss questions the two cops about their take on the rules of the road. She explains exactly why seeing this enraged her enough to post it:
At the 25 second mark, this video shows two cyclists on Haight Street demonstrating the "Idaho roll" (aka yielding at a stop sign rather than fully stopping) . . . the catch is that these are SF police officers on bikes. I am fully supportive of the "spirit of the law" approach to bike-riding, and wish that tickets were only given when a cyclist shows disregard for the safety/flow of others. I'm personally interested in this issue since I received a $388 ticket for failing to come to a full and complete stop at an EMPTY intersection on the Wiggle (In my case I applied my brakes and wasn't pedaling, but the officer wasn't moved by my "spirit of the law" defense).
We've heard of the Idaho roll, but that's not legal in San Francisco. We called Officer Albie Esparza, who tells us that cyclists are beholden to the exact same laws as cars. "By law they are no different than motor vehicles -- they must follow all the rules of the traffic code," Esparza tells us.

Well, you know what they say: Everyone breaks the law, but someone has to enforce it.

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8 comments
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Jack76
Jack76

Forget it Amy, it's Chinatown.

Goji
Goji

Funny! On the right coast we call it a "California roll", not an "Idaho roll". Anyway, you are pissy, otherwise you wouldn't have followed them and let them know you were filming them. Also, I think it's sad about your bike law. How pathetic is it to consider a bike the same thing as a motor vehicle. I believe people should be safe, but holy crap, does EVERYTHING have to be regulated, well, everything but mass production of false records...................ooops, I mean ALLEGED!

Pressto
Pressto

Amy also didn't stop at any of the stop signs in this video, so someone who is also breaking the law while complaining about others also doing it is just a hypocrite. If your goal is to promote safety then why don't you start with yourself before asking others to do it.

Mario Tanev
Mario Tanev

You have it all backwards. The original hypocrites are the cops. Amy is just pointing out their hypocrisy: obviously she believes in California stops for bicycles, but was ticketed for one, and points out that police who are on bikes realize that that it's insane to require a bicyclist to always put a foot down, but yet they penalize others to do it.

Rob Simmons
Rob Simmons

How can the original hypocrites be these cops? They would only be hypocrites if they were the ones who wrote her the ticket. Perhaps they understand the "spirit of the law" as well. Was the ticket writer even ON a bike?.

The only thing proven here is that police are human. They only way to solve this would to have stop sign cameras giving out tickets to everyone, but then you would be complaining about that.

heart_plus_mind
heart_plus_mind

Amy, the cyclist who captured this footage, was neither pissy nor enraged.  How do I know?  Well, it was me.  Perhaps sensationalism is Erin Sherbert's brand of reporting, but as I said in the quote above, I am fully supportive of the "spirit of the law" approach to bike-riding, and wish that tickets were only given when a cyclist shows disregard for the safety/flow of others.

I'm not interested in being divisive with this clip . . . my hope is to promote safety and flow for all modes of transportation. The spirit of the law is to be thoughtful and aware no matter how you get around and to ensure that everyone is safe and not to disrupt flow for the person with the right of way . . . that's how I roll.

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