Inmates to Prolong Hunger Strike -- by Eating

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That should boost your energy for a hunger strike
In what is being dubbed the largest prison hunger strike in recent history, more than 12,000 inmates from across California and some Southern states have been refusing food for the second consecutive week.

Prisoners in Arizona, Mississippi, and Oklahoma, along with inmates from 12 prisons across California, are skipping state-issued meals to protest what they call inhumane conditions. But, ironically, what's getting inmates through this strike is food.

Prisoners are on a what is being called a "rolling hunger strike," wherein they take turns munching on meals, which gives them just enough energy to sustain this strike, says Jay Donahue, spokesman for the Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity.

The hope is to have some inmates refusing meals at all times without worrying about anyone getting sick as some did during the 20-day hunger strike in July. As of last week, some 12,000 were on strike, according to the Federal Receiver's Office.

"I was shocked to see these numbers," Donahue told SF Weekly. "It's a testimony to the fact that many prisoners -- not just across California -- are experiencing those conditions -- there is no other recourse."

However, data from the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation contradict Donohue; officials released stats showing the number of inmates refusing to eat has been dropping every day. That could be because the state only considers an inmate on hunger strike when he or she misses nine consecutive meals. So a prisoner who skips two or three meals isn't counted as on hunger strike, says Terry Thornton, spokeswoman with the CDCR.

Inmates resumed the hunger strike last week, claiming the CDCR has not substantially met their demands, including include more sunshine and human contact for prisoners in solitary confinement. They also want sweeping changes to the CDCR's policies on gang identification, something the CDCR says it is working on. 

Last week, the CDCR barred attorneys representing the inmates from entering prison facilities, citing security issues. The lawyers called on Gov. Jerry Brown for help, but according to Donahue they have not heard back.

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guest
guest

Erin Sherbert - You're an idiot!  The inmates at Pelican Bay ended the hunger strike yesterday after the CDCR finally signed something promising to make changes to the illegal validation and debriefing process.  CDCR came crawling to them, asking them for a meeting with their offer.

How do you keep your job?  Your pathetic!

Shaihabit
Shaihabit

Prisoners already receive free and quite expensive(in some cases) medical care. That isn't enough? Maybe they should have thought about that before they committed their crimes. Smh@ppl feeling sorry for these ppl. They made their beds and the last thing the us ppl need is to pay more to feed them better food. So they're in confinement? ?? What'd they do to get there? NOTHING GOOD. What the activists need to do is buy a bulk of pacifiers and hand them out.

guest
guest

Prisoners are sentenced to time in prison, not never ending solitary confinement and torture.  Not every inmate is a murderer or bad person.  EVERYBODY makes mistakes, just not everybody gets caught.

Yuan Yi Peng
Yuan Yi Peng

[ SOS ] Complaint with Human Rights Violations by IBM China on Centennial 

Please Google:

Tragedy of Labor Rights Repression in IBM China

DJman_e
DJman_e

Brave inmates? How brave were they when they were raping or killing their victims?

Jeff Doyle
Jeff Doyle

Last week's reports stated the inmates were requesting "liquid supplements" to aid in their "hunger strike."  This is little more than a group diet.  Who cares?

Patrick
Patrick

IS it your role to snicker at these brave inmates?

Shaihabit
Shaihabit

Yes. Yes. I snicker at these "brave" inmate and at you. :)

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