Peninsula Priest Held in "Private" S.F. Location as Abuse Investigation Moves Forward

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A Menlo Park priest placed on leave following improper conduct with a 17-year-old parishioner has been relocated to a "private" location in San Francisco while an internal investigation of the incident moves forward, according to the Archdiocese of San Francisco.

Father William Meyers, pastor of St. Raymond's Catholic Church, admitted to following the teenage boy into a department store dressing room. After diocesan officials learned of the incident, they removed Meyers from active ministry. In a visit to the church on June 1, Bishop William Justice of San Francisco told parishioners that Meyers had admitted to having a "sexual addiction" involving adults, and had undergone therapy related to struggles with his "sexual identity" at the time of his ordination in Stockton.

Meyers is now posted to a private location in San Francisco, where he is not involved in any form of ministry and is not in proximity to children or young adults, according to archdiocese spokesman George Wesolek. He added that the diocesan independent review board, which examines allegations of child abuse, met on June 6 to look at Meyers' case. The next meeting is scheduled for July.

Police officials called by the 17-year-old's father determined that no crime had taken place in the dressing room. Wesolek said the archdiocese has asked other potential victims to come forward. To date, none have.

The investigation of Meyers comes as Roman Catholic bishops meet in Seattle. That conference has come under fire from reform advocates who criticize the bishops for choosing not to revisit their handling of molestation cases. These critics say the Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People, adopted in Dallas in 2002 in response to revelations of widespread abuse by priests, has proven inadequate, as evidenced by recent scandals in Philadelphia and Kansas City. Former San Francisco Archbishop William Levada, now a powerful official at the Vatican, helped midwife the 2002 reforms.

Wesolek said Meyers' case shows that the Church's current methods for responding to abuse suspicions are functioning properly. "We're not happy that these kind of events happen, but we are pleased that the policies in the charter are working," he says.

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Melanie Jula Sakoda
Melanie Jula Sakoda

The Catholic clergy sex abuse scandal won't be over until the bishops who endanger innocent children and vulnerable adults by ordaining men with "sexual addictions" and problems with "sexual identity" are prosecuted for their actions. We have perhaps seen the beginning of the end with recent criminal charges filed in Philadelphia, but the church will not be safe until more highly placed heads find themselves on the chopping block.

Melanie Jula SakodaSurvivors Network of those Abused by Priests (SNAP)SNAP East Bay Directorhttp://www.snapnetwork.org/ melanie@pokrov.org925-708-6175Toll Free Phone: 1-877-SNAPHEALS (1-877-762-7432)

Mikee
Mikee

Unsuccessful 'therapy' apparently. In their desperation to ordain 'sexless' celibates, they seem to just cross their fingers and hope for the best. The results of that strategy shouldn't be suprising. Too often, it appears they are not really evaluating, just taking temperature to be sure they alive.

gbullough
gbullough

A "private" location? Does the diocese have its own bath-house?

Judy Block-Jones
Judy Block-Jones

We urge anyone, who has knowledge or may havebeen harmed by Meyers, to contact police, not church officials. Sex crimes,however old, should be investigated by the independent professionals in lawenforcement, not the biased amateurs in church offices.

Also know that you are not alone, and if you havebeen harmed by this priest, there is help and a chance for healing.

Judy Jones, SNAP Midwest Associate Director, USA, 636-433-2511snapjudy@gmail.com"Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests"

Judy Block-Jones
Judy Block-Jones

We urge anyone, who has knowledge or may havebeen harmed by Meyers, to contact police, not church officials. Sex crimes,however old, should be investigated by the independent professionals in lawenforcement, not the biased amateurs in church offices.

Also know that you are not alone, and if you havebeen harmed by this priest, there is help and a chance for healing.

Judy Jones, SNAP Midwest Associate Director, USA, 636-433-2511snapjudy@gmail.com"Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests" http://www.snapnetwork.org/

Loyola Alum
Loyola Alum

The privatelocation for alleged Jesuit sex offenders in the Jesuit California Province ofCalifornia, Nevada, Utah, Arizona and Hawaii is at 300 College Ave., Los Gatos,California – next to the Testarossa Winery.

Kay4Justice
Kay4Justice

A diocesan review board is not trained to handle these kinds of cases and often causes the victim/survivor more pain. The police have determined that no crime was committed.  Of interest: ...'Meyers had admitted to having a "sexual addiction" involving adults, and had undergone therapy related to struggles with his "sexual identity" at the time of his ordination in Stockton.'  Not good enough, Wesolek. No crime occurred because this young man was smart enough to take himself out of there and report to his parent(s) who called the police.  When he is cleared by the review board because no crime occurred, where will you station "Father" Meyers, who admittedly has a sexual addiction?

Sam
Sam

There were two crimes committed by this priest against the victim but the police officer who made this "no crime" determination didn't have all the information about the situation...It was found out later...

Kay4Justice
Kay4Justice

So, are the police actually investigating further?  If not, it would be best if anyone reading this story contacts civil authorities if aware of any other instances.  These guys usually have several victims.  I guess they ordain anything they can get.  At the end of the day, they themselves created their problem and they deserve what they get in return.

Sam
Sam

It's in the hands of the city prosecutors now. Whatever they decide to do will find out soon...

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