Obama's Drug Czar Refuses to Meet With Cops Seeking End to War on Drugs

Categories: Marijuana
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No you didn't!
In what way is Barack Obama similar to Richard Nixon (aside from ramping up someone else's foreign war)? Turns out common ground can also be found between Tricky Dick and BHO II when it comes to the drug war.

A few weeks ago we told you about California NORML unhappily celebrating the 100th anniversary of American marijuana prohibition. But it seems there is another milestone to "celebrate" in the War on Drugs: It was 40 years ago this week when the term "drug war" itself entered our zeitgeist. Following that, there was a steady parade of one million dope smokers, sniffers, and shooters entering our criminal justice system annually.

To mark the occasion, police officers who comprise the promarijuana legalization group -- Law Enforcement Against Prohibition -- decided to pay a visit to one of their brethren: drug czar Gil Kerlikowske, the former Seattle police chief who is now head of the White House Office of Drug Control Policy.

It was Kerlikowske who two years ago declared the War on Drugs was over -- sorta. What he really wanted was a departure from the "war" analogy. But the problem with that is the tactics of the antidrug effort resemble a gun battle more than a public health struggle. So the LEAP crew tried to hand deliver to Kerlikowske a report released Tuesday, which takes the Obama Administration to task for "ramping up a drug war it claims it ended."

Kerlikowske was anything but receptive to his brothers in blue; he declined to see them, instead sending a staffer get the report.

The report holds Obama accountable for his drug-friendly public statements -- like declaring the War on Drugs a failure during the campaign, which has yet to turn into policy. Obama, like his two predecessors, "used illicit drugs and then went on to have [a] productive [life]," the report says. "In deed, if not in word, President Obama has presided over a drug war that has been waged at a rate virtually indistinguishable from that of his recent predecessors."

It was on June 17, 1971, that Nixon told Congress that "America's public enemy No. 1 in the United States is drug abuse. In order to fight and defeat this enemy, it is necessary to wage a new, all-out offensive."

This all-out offensive was ramped up in the 1980s, when Nancy Reagan's "Just Say No" campaign started. Since that campaign, which coincided with the crack epidemic, there has been a steady increase in cost and drug casualties, according to figures included in LEAP's report, titled: "Ending the Drug War: A Dream Deferred."

Hardened observers of the drug war won't find much new in the 20-page report -- though it's sometimes handy to be reminded that, ironically, drug-related killings in Mexico have increased 60 percent from 2009 to 2010. Yet they were essentially nonexistent in 2006, the same year Mexican President Felipe Calderón began his crackdown on the cartels, which now control drug markets in 230 American cities. That's notable because it's signed off on by a cadre of current and former narcotics officers, chiefs of police, prosecutors, and other former drug warriors.

Sometimes the messenger is everything.

And then again, sometimes it's not, as was the case Tuesday when these same cops were not allowed access to Kerlikowske.

"The fact that he refused to sit down with us and discuss these issues speaks volumes about how much the Obama Administration would rather ignore the failed War on Drugs than do anything to actually address it," says Neil Franklin, a former Baltimore narcotics cop who now serves as LEAP's executive director.

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13 comments
Hal Mason
Hal Mason

FLIPPIN and FLOPPIN I would never vote for this IDIOT again!

waynephillips
waynephillips

TheWar on Drugs is a costly pretense that undermines national integrityand adds significantly to the national debt. It fosters systemiccorruption and distrust of authority figures. It enriches organizedcrime and allows for CIA & DEA to engage in covert drug trafficking. TheWar on Drugs endangers every aspect of society, from youth andcommunities to those who enforce it; all while offering nosignificant gain or chance of winning.

TheWar on Drugs, like the notion of a “drug-free society” in the21stcentury, is an unmitigated absurdity. As such, it is suspect or, at least, should be. Afterall, if drugs truly were the scourge prohibitionists claim, whyestablish and maintain a system that, rather than providing checks and balances(like the sales of alcohol and tobacco does), provides organizedcrime groups and their affiliates with virtually carte blanche ordefacto control of where, when and to whom drugs are sold?

jontomas
jontomas

The people have been placed into a near catotonic state, where they will accept any outrageous behavior the government engages in.

As for me, I am tired of 40 years of being jerked around.  I will NEVER vote again for a candidate who doesn't promise to do everything he can to end the monstrously destructive, counter-productive fraud of marijuana prohibition.

The only candidate that has promised it so far is Gary Johnson.  If no other candidates does, I will vote for Johnson if I have to write him in.

Shaunblood2410
Shaunblood2410

It goes to show that Obama is weak and pityful he'd rather ignore those that helped bring him into office. I see the Need to up the anty to end the War on Drugs Hemp Fest Should Be Bigger and hold Parade's Why is it that Homo Sexual's can get married??? I think our plight is worse being arrested by police and worrying about special narco cop's they are sneaky and assualt the innocent instead of protect,serve the police have failed the American People!!

jontomas
jontomas

Everyone who has been paying attention knows marijuana is less "addictive" than coffee and FAR less harmful than alcohol. So why do we still have this barbaric persecution? Because police, prosecutors and politicians build their careers and empires on it. Because industries like alcohol and pharmaceuticals don't want the competition. Because other interests like the drug treatment/testing industry and the prison industries depend on it for their life's blood. Because many shaky corporations couldn't exist without the laundered money. And because government uses marijuana prohibition as a means of controlling minorities and the poor. It's also probable the huge underground black-market funds government black-ops, as well as provide a very useful clandestine conduit for myriad dark operations.Finally, of course, the TRILLIONS of dollars made by the drug gangs have not been buried in the ground. They have been invested in legitimate business, causing another huge support of this persecution of millions of innocent people. (See Catherine Austin Fitts "Narco Dollars For Beginners." - keeping in mind that while Fitts employs cocaine because it best suits her metaphor, FBI statistics show marijuana sales comprise 80 percent of all "illegal" drug transactions.) http://www.ratical.org/co-glob... time to close down the marijuana-prohibition-industrial-complex!

jontomas
jontomas

Everyone who has been paying attention knows marijuana is less "addictive" than coffee and FAR less harmful than alcohol. So why do we still have this barbaric persecution? Because police, prosecutors and politicians build their careers and empires on it. Because industries like alcohol and pharmaceuticals don't want the competition. Because other interests like the drug treatment/testing industry and the prison industries depend on it for their life's blood. Because many shaky corporations couldn't exist without the laundered money. And because government uses marijuana prohibition as a means of controlling minorities and the poor. It's also probable the huge underground black-market funds government black-ops, as well as provide a very useful clandestine conduit for myriad dark operations.Finally, of course, the TRILLIONS of dollars made by the drug gangs have not been buried in the ground. They have been invested in legitimate business, causing another huge support of this persecution of millions of innocent people. (See Catherine Austin Fitts "Narco Dollars For Beginners." - keeping in mind that while Fitts employs cocaine because it best suits her metaphor, FBI statistics show marijuana sales comprise 80 percent of all "illegal" drug transactions.)

 http://www.ratical.org/co-glob... time to declare war on the marijuana-prohibition-industrial-complex!

aldo laghi
aldo laghi

in 2008 Obama got elected by the confluence of several unusual occurrences:1 an unpopular war had been going on for years2 an unpopular president had been irritating independents for years3 a financial catastrophe was looming on the country which was being blamed artfully by the liberals onto the GOP4 a contender (McCain) who ran what can arguably be called the worst presidential campaign in recent memory5 an unusual participation of blacks in the ballot as they had been skillfully herded to vote6 a successful slogan that resonated with frustrated voters: hope and change7 a public that knew nothing of Obama and his deficiencies and was optimistic about the mannone of the above advantages are going to be available to Obama in 2012. Therefore i believe that he will be resoundly defeated irrespective of who the GOP contender will be.pretty much the 20102 vote will be a referendum on Obama and not on his contender, just like in 2008 with bush

Greg
Greg

Ignore, Ignore, Ignore!... Ignorant government!

Guest
Guest

Unfortunately most of America is irrational still.  Reality TV and those that watch any form of it prove that point..

Greg
Greg

We still think violence is the answer to social ills, and that we must punish peoples vices. That what a person does with his own body in his own home, and harms no one else's person or property, should be defined as a crime and punished. I suggest rather that what a drug user does would not BE so harmful were it not illegal, the harms associated with marijuana stem from the fact that it is illegal. So society creates a harm where there would be none, to punish people for harming themselves with the harm that was created by society in the first place? Now tell me where is the sense in that? Oh by the way, we are a society of drug users, it's just that some drugs are legal and licit, like caffeine, prescription drugs,and alcohol the most dangerous drug of all. Others are illegal and illicit, like marijuana. Tobacco is becoming illicit, let us hope for the stability of society it remains legal. Why can we not make marijuana legal? Treat it like tobacco or alcohol, if you wish, run your propaganda campaigns, etc. etc. Just end the prohibition!

Brandt Hardin
Brandt Hardin

The War on Drugs failed Billions of dollars ago!  This money could have been used for outreachprograms to clean up the bad end of drug abuse by providing free HIV testing,free rehab, and clean needles.  Harmlessdrugs like marijuana could be legalized to help boost our damaged economy.  Cannabis can provide hemp for countlessnatural recourses and the tax revenue from sales alone would pull every statein our country out of the red!  VoteTeapot, PASS IT, and legalize it.  Voiceyou opinion with the movement and check out my pro-cannabis art at http://dregstudiosart.blogspot...  

Tai
Tai

Don't let up! Rationality will win in the end.

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