Metallica's Kirk Hammett on What He Loves About Horror

Categories: In Print

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Kirk Hammett, horror freak.
From the latest SF Weekly:

Kirk Hammett on his new Fear FestEvil: I've been attracted to horror movies ever since I was a young child. Back then I just loved getting scared. It was a very exciting thing for me to sit there and check out cool-looking monsters and get scared. As an adult I can be more philosophical about it, and say it puts me in touch with my own mortality and all that other bullshit, but bottom line is, I still get a thrill from watching horror movies, and that thrill is the same thrill I had when I was a kid. It never died. Maybe I just still have yet to fucking grow up, I don't know. But for me a good horror movie is like a good heavy metal song.... [continue reading]


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The Magik*Magik Orchestra Celebrates Five Years of Playing Whatever You Need

Categories: In Print

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Moses Namkung
The Magik*Magik Orchestra performing with John Vanderslice.
From the latest SF Weekly:

Magik*Magik Turns Five: Conceived as a loose group of classical players available to record with bands who don't normally think beyond the guitar/drum/bass set-up, Magik*Magik has grown into a professional quality orchestral appendage available to anyone who can pay its relatively modest fees. In the five years since Choi founded it, Magik*Magik has performed at dozens of concerts, on a national tour with Death Cab for Cutie, on the score of the film Looper, at weddings, children's birthday parties, and on countless recording sessions in groups as small as one and as large as 70.

It is, as Choi imagined while a master's student in composition at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, an orchestra that comes made-to-order. It is also a living advertisement for the power of traditional instrumentation. In a world where classical music is routinely dismissed as dead or dying, Magik*Magik is a reminder of the unique tones and dynamics that cellos, violins, oboes, French horns, and other classical instruments can lend that others simply can't. [continue reading]


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Is San Francisco's Garage-Pop Phase Over?

Categories: In Print

Thee Oh Sees are on hiatus, and the best new rock bands in S.F. don't sound much like them.
From the latest SF Weekly:

Garage Is Over: S.F.'s youngest, most innovative, and boundary-pushing musicians don't relate to the "Dwyers and Segalls" -- nor their goofier kitsch-rocker contemporaries -- because that music doesn't speak to the very arduous and frustrating experience of living as an artist in one of the most economically unequal regions in the country. The forces driving away certain high-profile figures of the psychedelic garage-pop scene are a potent catalyst for others who make a different kind of music. The most original and vital new rock music in S.F. today reflects the city's current tension and volatility. [continue reading]


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If You Want a Vibrant Music Scene in S.F., Go To More Shows

Categories: In Print

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The Soft Moon performs at Cafe Du Nord
From the latest SF Weekly:

Want to Keep Your Music Scene?: We, the music fans, must know that we influence what happens here. We need to understand why places we think we love have to close or undergo vast changes -- places like Viracocha, Savannah Jazz Club, Cafe Du Nord, and Rassela's Jazz Club, to name a few examples from 2013.

It's not the techies, whoever we think they are. It's not gentrification, of which nearly everyone reading this is probably guilty in some sense. It's all of us. Clubs close because you and I didn't go to them enough. [continue reading]


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DJ Parker "FOODCOURT" Gibbs Gives Back, But Only After Giving Hell

Categories: In Print

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Mike Hendrickson
Parker Gibbs, aka DJ FOODCOURT
From the latest SF Weekly:

Holiday Craptacular: Every year, DJ Parker "FOODCOURT" Gibbs throws a holiday party at the Make-Out Room that shows off his signature style, where he gets his musician buddies together and has them all play a revue-style show with a house band, performing covers, holiday songs, or originals. In between performers, Gibbs gets on the mic and, as he says, "berates people." Lots of drinks are had. He calls it "The GIBBSMO Holiday Craptacular," a name for which he's gotten some crap. "At the beginning," he says, "people didn't like the name: 'I don't like the name "Crapctacular," it just sounds kinda mean.' I'm like, 'Fuck you guys. That's what it is. We're throwing a bunch of shit on the wall and seeing what sticks. It's fantastic and people love it.'" [continue reading]


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Potrero Club Mighty Celebrates 10 Years of Greatness

Categories: In Print

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Navjit Gill
From the latest SF Weekly:

Distant Thunder: It might not seem all that long, but a decade is a lifetime in club years. The nightlife industry is one of constant change, and, in all likelihood, those clubs that are popular today won't be tomorrow. And those venues that do manage to stick around can easily get trapped in a downward spiral of noise complaints, changing tastes, and diminishing returns. With that said, it's a testament to the vitality of Mighty that the warehouse-like Potrero Hill nightclub has managed to stay relevant for so long. December marks the passage of the venue's 10th year in San Francisco. [continue reading]


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Sinead O'Connor Was Right: The Irish Rocker Takes Controversial Stands For Good Reasons

Categories: In Print

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From the latest SF Weekly:

Sinead O'Connor: O'Connor wore white lace and tore the pope in half, in half again, and once more. Throwing eight papal scraps into the audience, she shouted, "Fight the real enemy!" Thundering silence followed, during which O'Connor calmly, or anyway without shaking, took off the ear-clip headphone monitor wire, collected her papers, and left. No one clapped, but not a single annoyed New Yorker booed, either. She was young that night -- did she know what damage she'd done to her professional life? After the pope thing, she "became a joke," even getting booed offstage at Madison Square Garden at a Bob Dylan tribute concert. "It definitely dealt a near-lethal blow to her career," according to Rolling Stone. [continue reading]

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Physicist Carl Haber Brings Sounds From the Past Back to Life

Categories: In Print

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Courtesy of the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
Carl Haber salvages the shape of sounds.

From the latest SF Weekly:

Carl Haber: Carl Haber was recently awarded a MacArthur Genius Grant for a breakthrough technology known as the IRENE Project, which non-invasively "reads" fragile old audio recordings and converts them into crystal-clear digital files. But at 8 a.m., he's slumped in a chair, catching up on e-mails on his phone and catching his breath after spending two hours getting his son from the East Bay to school in Glen Park, thanks to the BART strike. Haber oozes humility, a surprising trait for a scientist who has just been publicly named a genius and awarded $625,000 for the honor. What earned Haber and his team the award is a technique for capturing high resolution images of the surfaces of sound recordings that are too old and fragile to be played, such as wax cylinders or shellac. [continue reading]

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Cass McCombs: Either Putting Us On, or Really Goddamn Sincere

Categories: In Print

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From the latest SF Weekly:

Cass McCombs: This is Cass "Our solitude connects us with our sorrow" McCombs. He's from Northern California, and he lives on couches and floors and other people's beds and in his car, which he drives, alone, back and forth across the country from New York to San Francisco to Los Angeles and then back around again, a true rambling modern folk singer-songwriter, even when he isn't on tour, although he prefers being on tour. He is 35 and was married once. He puts out records on the Domino label, mostly pared-down rock affairs, lots of them rather dark, some parts of them kinda dull. But his latest, Big Wheel and Others, is a double album that achieves the incredibly rare double-album feat: It's fantastic from its start, from the lumbering, drone-like trucker rock of "Big Wheel," to the ghostly acoustic blues of album closer "Unearthed," and through all the half-jazz jams and morbid pop ditties and Dylanesque country vignettes in between. [continue reading]

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For Fresh & Onlys Guitarist Wymond Miles, Darkness Is the Daily Norm

Categories: In Print

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From the latest SF Weekly:

Wymond Miles: Wymond Miles' home is haunted. The 35-year-old solo artist and guitarist in pop romantic outfit The Fresh & Onlys moved into the three-story Balboa Park unit in 2007 with his wife, Sarah. In 2009, she gave birth to their son, Julian, inside the home. The living room is mood-lit a pale orange and Miles' new solo album, Cut Yourself Free, spins on the turntable. Suddenly, a clamorous crash from upstairs disrupts the listening session. Miles bounds up toward the noise and returns with a sheepish grin. "Sorry, we have a ghost," he says. "It's okay, though, we know who it is." The phantom apparently sent some window blinds to the floor. "Sarah and I were just up there laughing about it," he says. "It's a significant day for us, so we're not surprised it's acting up." [continue reading]


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