This Week: Treasure Island! Sleigh Bells! Disclosure! DJ Harvey! and More

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Sleigh Bells
Yes, it's Treasure Island Music Festival this weekend. And while you cross your fingers hoping this lovely weather will hold through Saturday and Sunday, take a look at our bevy of stories from this week's print edition, which includes preview coverage of the festival in the middle of the Bay and much more.

Sleigh Bells: Miller calls Bitter Rivals the first Sleigh Bells record that is "our record," and is openly relieved at having Krauss' increased involvement. "Now that she's a part of it, it's not just me, it's this other thing completely," he says. "I can sit back and appreciate it without having to feel like I'm looking in the mirror the whole time." He still writes the band's beats, instrumental parts, and lyrics. But Bitter Rivals suggests that the way forward for Sleigh Bells may be giving Krauss even more room to do her thing. [continue reading]

Disclosure: Every year, a few albums manage to seep out of whatever genre they ostensibly belong to and attain far broader appeal. One of those successes in 2013 has been the thrilling synthesis of house, pop, and U.K. Garage wrought by the brothers in English duo Disclosure. Buoyed by propulsive rhythms and electric melodies, their debut album, Settle, has leaped out of the world of club music and garnered the attention of a public eager to see where pop is going in the 21st century. Ahead of the band's set at Treasure Island, we talked to 22-year-old Guy Lawrence about Disclosure's song-focused approach to dance music, the exhaustion of touring during a breakthrough year, and why the band's skeptics -- who've accused it of diluting and even exploiting underground styles -- can shove it. [continue reading]

DJ Harvey: Many DJs are respected, but few have the same kind of cult following as DJ Harvey. The British expat has a 30-year history as a disc jockey and party-thrower, with an astounding career that's involved such highs as a weekly residency at the original Ministry of Sound in London, forming the influential early-'90s Tonka Soundsystem rave crew in the U.K., and inspiring the recent cosmic disco revival with his marathon warehouse parties in downtown Los Angeles, where he lives. Throughout it all, his style has remained the same, incorporating humor, masterful DJ chops, and beautifully obscure music into sets that can run as long as 11 hours. He's playing Public Works this Friday, so we decided to call him up and see what makes him tick. [continue reading]

Sizzle & Fizzle: Highs and lows from the week in S.F. music.

And! We recommend shows from Ginger Baker, Goblin, and
Wymond Miles.


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