Live Review, 5/19/12: UnderCover's Paranoid Draws Sabbath Out, Softens It Up

UnderCoverWAR PIGS.jpg
Extra Action Marching Band ft. Robin Coomer (Loop!Station) performing "War Pigs"

UnderCover Presents Black Sabbath's Paranoid
Various Artists
Saturday, May 19, 2012
The Independent

Better than: Trying to hold a conversation with Ozzy Osbourne.

There are a few reasons Ozzy Osbourne would bite the head off UnderCover Presents' live version of Black Sabbath's Paranoid. For one thing, there's a time and a place for breath meditation, and a Black Sabbath tribute concert ain't it. Saturday night at The Independent, in the latest installment of the approximately quarterly project, more than 50 Bay Area musicians took on Black Sabbath's second and arguably greatest record. The project gathers local performers to reinvent, re-record, and perform an iconic album under the guidance of a local guest music director, in this case bass clarinet player and composer Cornelius Boots (whose version executive producer Lyz Luke introduced as "one of the most demanding" in UnderCover's short history).

It wasn't for lack of talent that most of the ensembles -- performing in genres like world fusion, avant-prog, and chamber-core -- failed to capture the essence of the pioneering heavy metal band. There were interesting moments, such as a deliriously eerie dreamy apocalyptic folk intro to "Iron Man" by Charming Hostess. But the whole show didn't feel cohesive, the pauses between sets were irritatingly long (except when you left to move your car for Bay to Breakers street closures and walked back 20 minutes later to find you hadn't missed anything), and there was certainly no journey to the underworld. At least not the one you bought a ticket to. It's also worth noting that a metal show without a mosh-pit misses the mark. Sure, nobody was expecting it to get too crazy. After all, the eclectic musical stylings of the contributing artists were well advertised. But no mosh-pit? No headbanging? No devil horn hand signals? No way! If Ozzy were there, he would have gurgled "oy at ure ullshit aaaghhh ussies!" And so did we.

In 1970, the Vietnam War was just past its peak, and Paranoid was released in September with the lead track "War Pigs." At the time it could have been construed as a controversial anti-war statement. Forty-two years later, the Extra Action Marching Band (featuring Robin Coomer on vocals) performed it with go-go dancers in sequined bras and panties, trumpets strapped to machine guns, and lots of choreography. It was Vietnam War, the Musical. It was an ambitious performance and surely meant to be a showstopper, but because of the offensively long Apocalypse Now-style intro, at a certain point you just wanted it to stop: Okay, those spotlights are supposed to be helicopters, got it. Oh no, here they come again. And again. I think they already played this gun effect. Is there time to get another drink?

Under Cover ELECTRIC FUNERAL.jpg
Sabbaticus Rex & the Axe-Wielders of Chaos with Cornelius Boots on Japanese flute performing Electric Funeral

Paranoid is a 42-minute album and it took over three hours to cough up. This is too bad for a variety of reasons, not the least of which is the most true-to-Sabbath performances came at the end. Uriah Duffy, The Memorials, and Jeremy Von Epp's dub metal rendition of "Paranoid" came with a warning from Duffy via an introductory video. He mentioned the verbatim covers of "Paranoid" that bands such as Metallica, Green Day, and Megadeth have delivered, and said this was "something that would make an anal retentive diehard fan of Sabbath really angry." Fair enough. Remember when Jada Pinkett Smith had a metal band? That band was more metal than this band. As seemed to be a pattern over the course of the concert, the instrumentals were quite good but the singers failed to wail. (On a side note, the prerecorded album sounds a lot better than the live performances did Saturday.) The exceptions and most true-to-Sabbath performances came on the vocals of "Electric Funeral" by Sabbaticus Rex & the Axe-Wielders of Chaos (despite being an intuitive avant world progressive rock interpretation), and "Rat Salad," with almost too-fast-to-believe drumming from Moe! Staiano of Surplus 1980.

UnderCover Presents is a mixed bag. Despite how you feel about the outcome of each group they tribute (past concerts have recreated albums from the Pixies and the Velvet Underground & Nico), it's worth moving onto the next if the last try didn't suit you. We don't think the prince of darkness would approve of Saturday's show. It wasn't dark, doomy, or chew-the-head-off-a-bat-shit crazy enough. Folk might suit this project better. Luckily Joni Mitchell's, Blue is up next.

Critic's Notebook

Overheard: Guy 1: "I'm so much more metal than you." Guy 2: "I have to agree."

Setlist
1. War Pigs (chaotic mania featuring siren song)
Artist: Extra Action Marching Band ft. Robin Coomer (Loop!Station)

2. Paranoid (dub metal)
Artist: Uriah Duffy, The Memorials & Jeremy Von Epp

3. Planet Caravan (world fusion)
Artist: Novilunio

4. Iron Man (dreamy apocalyptic folk)
Artist: Charming Hostess

5. Electric Funeral (intuitive avant world progressive rock)
Artist: Sabbaticus Rex & the Axe-Wielders of Chaos

6. Hand of Doom (lightning thunder jet rock)
Artist: Tiger Honey Pot w/ Max Baloian ft. Barbara Byers

7. Rat Salad (percussive post-punk)
Artist: Surplus 1980

8. Fairies Wear Boots (avant-prog chamber-core)
Artist: miRthkon

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Location Info

Venue

Map

The Independent

628 Divisadero, San Francisco, CA

Category: Music

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30 comments
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Fart
Fart

pretty dumb idea. i can't believe that anyone actually liked this. who's stupid idea was this? do other cities just laugh at SF?

hinterlands
hinterlands

I'm not sure why a negative review always means that people have to gang up on a music writer and dismiss the entire practice of writing about music. Not everything in the music writing world should be a blow job for the performers just because they played some music. Show some respect and open-mindedness for the tough task of discussing music without complimenting every sound that comes your way. Elizabeth Pfeffer did an excellent review here that, a couple of small typos and gripes aside, came off as incredibly informed and articulate. Sorry that not every comment on your production is a kiss and a compliment.

Black Badger
Black Badger

 Certainly listening to, writing about, and performing music is totally subjective and a matter of taste. But this blog review epitomizes my favorite paraphrase of Shaw's old adage: "Those who can, do; those who can't, write."

You're right that not all reviews can be filled with empty praise like "Good job!" and "You get an A for effort" but for Pfeffer to have completely missed the point of the performance and to express her barely concealed disgust at its execution is too much for many of us who were there. It is in fact a measured respect for music writers and critics that has led some of us to respond publicly rather than ignoring the review, thereby giving in to a smug self-assurance that the SFWeekly and Pfeffer are completely irrelevant to the local music scene.

hinterlands
hinterlands

[[Certainly listening to, writing about, and performing music is totally subjective and a matter of taste. But this blog review epitomizes my favorite paraphrase of Shaw's old adage: "Those who can, do; those who can't, write."]]

This is one of the most misguided and lamest cliches that's ever been popularized. Couldn't we modify this 10,000 different ways? "Those who can, do; those who can't, teach" or "Those who can, do; those who can't, just watch from the audience" or whatever else. This is up there with the idea that "You can't make a movie so you're jealous if you insult so-and-so director's movie!" I mean, can't you just genuinely not like a movie and not want to be a film maker yourself? I'll insult a politician or my dentist, but that doesn't mean I want either of those jobs either. Stop dumbing things down and marginalizing the entire practice of criticism when it's important to every arm of the arts. It's obviously not as important as making art itself is, but it still serves an important purpose.

Also, why is it so bad that she felt disgust at this product? Why do you want her to hide her opinion in the first place? That would make for weak writing and she would be disingenuous about how she really feels. If there's one thing worse than an asshole, it's a liar who is pretending not to be an asshole. Let her have her opinion, especially considering she has explained in both article and comments.

[["It is in fact a measured respect for music writers and critics that has led some of us to respond publicly rather than ignoring the review, thereby giving in to a smug self-assurance that the SFWeekly and Pfeffer are completely irrelevant to the local music scene."]]If there was respect for music writers and critics, they would not be underminding the value of her opinion to such an extent. Why can't you just be gracious and say, 'Thanks for the review. I'm bummed out you didn't enjoy it, but I appreciate you giving it a chance'? If she had damning factual errors, that's the time to start sharpening the knives.

LyzLuke
LyzLuke

It was a joke.  Much like [["If Ozzy were there, he would have gurgled "oy at ure ullshit aaaghhh ussies!" And so did we."]] was a joke.   I'm allowed to have a sense of humor too.  :)

I still believe that even though she gave us a negative review, it's been nice to see that  there have been so many positive responses.  To each their own.

hinterlands
hinterlands

I was all the way with you until the final para and about to compliment on your good form as someone involved in this production, and then you closed with an unnecessary dismissive and passive-aggressive comment. You also went to another cliched argument with the "I guess her taste just drastically differs from a lot of people's" comment, which matches the "Well, [xxx number] of people CAN'T be wrong so she must be" argument. I mean, this is a country that has made a whole hell of a lot of untalented people popular and famous, so trying invoke the idea that popular judgment is the only right form of opinion is such a wrong way to go. In a passive-aggressive manner, you are saying her taste is wrong and the majority's ("a lot of people's") taste is right. I just don't buy that. That's like someone saying that your production must be a failure because it was held at The Independent instead of the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium, which would be a completely moronic way to go as a bunch of people liking something says nothing about its artistic value.

LyzLuke
LyzLuke

Just wanted to say that overall I've had great experiences with SF Weekly (minus a few times when they missed including us in a few calendar sections b/c they were going through staff changes ...for this show and when we did Doolittle).  Half the people commenting on this article weren't involved with the production as far as I know.  

Honestly, even if she found this "boring", this has been the most commented on press that we've ever received.  It's been nice to see fans sticking up for what I thought was an an outstanding production.  No such thing as bad press, I guess.

Elizabeth's welcome to her own opinions.  I guess her taste just drastically differs from a lot of people's.  I guess I now know not to invite her to anything else involving visuals, dance routines, costumes, interviews with local artists, street parking, or varying genres of music.  Don't want her to get bored or worse...for her to get a parking ticket.

Recalcitrantcookie
Recalcitrantcookie

I had a great time! Which was just as much inspired by the hundreds of really happy, excited, smiling people around me as the happy, creative, truly invested (and it showed) musicians on stage! But there are always going to be those couple of Debbie Downers I guess. I wouldn't worry about her, directly invested Under Cover peeps, because the event already happened and everyone (except this blogger) walked out of there so happy...!! And with a great CD to boot.

SenoritaOverdrive
SenoritaOverdrive

Well, better late than never on that mosh pit.

 

Many of the Sabbath tunes on Saturday were sung by women,was that where the Jada Pinkett Smith thing came from? I don’t get it, and Idon’t get the hostility toward the show and its performers. I think Sean D dida great job of summarizing the strengths and weaknesses of the show. And Ms.Pfeffer’s review does a great job of reminding me why I go see live music in person.

 

Now for a little fun:

 

Critic Robert Christgau (“Dean of American Rock Critics”) onBlack Sabbath:

 

Black Sabbath [WarnerBros., 1970]The worst of the counterculture on a plastic platter—bullsh*t necromancy,drug-impaired reaction time, long solos, everything. They claim to oppose war,but if I don't believe in loving my enemies I don't believe in loving my allieseither, and I've been worried something like this was going to happen since thefirst time I saw a numerology column in an underground newspaper. C-

 

Paranoid [WarnerBros., 1970]They do take heavy to undreamt-of extremes, and I suppose I could enjoy them ascamp, like a horror movie--the title cut is definitely screamworthy. After all,their audience can't take that Lucifer bit seriously, right? Well, depends onwhat you mean by serious. Personally, I've always suspected that horror movies catharsizedstuff I was too rational to care about in the first place. C-

 

And the beat goes on!

violet
violet

I awoke in aural afterglow the day after the show, "Planet Caravan" playing through my mind as it had been all night whilst I dreamt of other dimensions. The marriage of lilting Eastern European vocal harmonies with the textures of unusual instruments of the world left this Sabbath fan haunted and pleased. 

 I would think that after such an interesting show it would be impossible to write a boring review however this "journalist" has a real talent for it. Were I the reviewer I would be so busy writing about the plethora of outstanding musicians that it would never have occurred to me to devote ink to bitching about needing to move my car. I see how that brings the evening to life and reader out of the venue, away from the music and into the tiny, pedestrian world of Ms. Pfferrerrerer, who's greatest and fatal flaw was to arrive with expectations of the ordinary. That coupled with her obvious lack of musical knowledge make for a tone deaf review.

Having broken two ribs in a mosh pit, having been to the shows like Testament opening for Merciful Fate at the Stone,  I will assume that I am quite likely"more metal" than the reviewer. But here's the whole point: no one was trying to be "more metal" than anyone else, trying to "out metal" Black Sabbath is like trying to "out skinny" Karen Carpenter.

One look at the bill, if you are remotely familiar with the bay area music scene, would tell you that the producers clearly have vast and varied musical tastes and a sense of humor to boot. It almost goes without saying that the musical director picked the strangest bands around and advised them to do anything but sound like a cookie-cutter copy of the original.

While there were certainly some hardcore moments with ripping guitar solos and the drummers for Uriah Duffy, Tiger Honey Pot and Surplus 1980 tearing it up in ways I'm sure Bill Ward would appreciate, good musicians know that shredding is no more valid then breath meditation, tuvan throat singing or playing shakuhachi flute. I was thrilled that extremely unique, rare and foreign instruments were brought to the table, to me they exemplify the richness of the bay area music scene. The Indonesian Gamelan, the rare and coveted Hang of PanArts, the Englehart bells, gongs, djembe and Taiko drums brought out new layers in an album I know by heart.

I find it interesting that the review mentions the Extra Action dancers in sequin bras and panties and doesn't mention the bondage masks and riffles which made them far more sinister than any go-go dancers.  I believe they were meant to represent the "war machine," faceless, shining, dangerous. Toward the end of the song, during the lyrics "day of judgement," the masks are ripped off and faces bloodied, meaning the faceless war profiteers get exposed and killed. Or...perhaps I'm reading more into it than was there, but that's the thing with performance art, you have to have an imagination to appreciate and complete the story from your own knowledge and experience.  Extra Action offers you the candy, it's up to you to get in the car.

In closing, some people see ink splatters, some see a minotaur dancing the tango with a unicorn.  Creative, engaged, cultured people got a great show. For the author, you missed out, open your mind and ears, cultivate your imagination, turn off 107.7 "the Bone" and check out bands likeSecret Chiefs 3, Idiot Flesh and Kitka before you presume to write about the bay area music scene. 

philip gelb
philip gelb

This music writer has obviously completely missed the point of this show. Ok, i am biased as i was a performer in one of the pieces (Electric Funeral).   The creativity and vision of music director, Cornelius Boots was most evident, that evening. Rather than simply choose people to imitate the originals, he sought out local musicians to find inspiration in the originals and then explore. And there were some very successful explorations throughout the evening along with some truly over the top and highly inspired performances!   Noone got on stage to imitate the original version and well, face it, that is boring, uninspired and totally meaningless, unless you are a high school musician, just starting to develop.  If you only want to hear cliches, there are a lot of bands and concerts you can listen to. Part of the joy of being in the audience for the other 6 pieces was the constant element of surprise.  Then again, i listen to music because i want to hear inspiration, not the same old cliches, i have heard over and over. Of all the projects of Boots that i have heard (and this is the second chance to collaborate with him), cliches never are to be found. Instead he prefers to explore the unknown, using inspiration from a wide variety of sonic and other resources. A real music writer would recognise these things and highly praise the musical direction of this concert.

High praise to Faultline studios or initiating these projects!!!

Black Badger Bone
Black Badger Bone

The presumption of most music critics who (try to) write for a living is that they know what they're talking about. Sadly, even among those with (perhaps) the most eclectic taste and appreciation, there is still plenty that they write that pisses off music fans and musicians. I have composed, arranged, and played in a wide variety of styles (I hesitate to label them "genres" since that implies discrete and tangible boundaries, which, as the best musicians will tell you, do not exist) and I found the "Paranoid" tribute to be crazily ambitious - and satisfying.

A cover band that uses the same instrumentation and imitates the execution of a recording is not being creative; they are merely musical parrots. That may be satisfying for fans who were never able to experience an ensemble in person, or who are desperately trying to recapture that initial euphoria of seeing them, but it will never satisfy the creative longings of a musician or a fan. A tribute band/project is a way of paying homage to another band/composer/project that clearly must include some of the original elements of that band/composer/project. But if it doesn't also contain a certain amount of personal arranging (giving a melody to a different instrument to give it a different timbre for a different emotional response for example, or adding a few more voicings with or without harmony) then there's no "tribute" except to say "we like it just the way it is, so don't change anything." That doesn't require any talent.

UnderCover is ambitious in its scope and execution. Acknowledging some pivotal moments in recorded (at least Euro-American) music history and gathering a wide array of talent from the enormous pool that exists in the Bay Area to have them pay tribute to those moments is nothing if not honorable. And there is certainly a good dose of narcissism (for those who were asked to play) and exclusion (from those who weren't) involved. But to lament a failure to capture a headbanging bacchanalia as part of a Black Sabbath tribute is just weak. Of all the problems to pick out, decrying the lack of the proper mood that is attributed to metal shows reeks of desperation. As has already been pointed out above, the show was not advertised as a metal show, and arguably, there were no metal bands performing that night. Point missed; reviewer FAIL.

Elizabeth Pfeffer
Elizabeth Pfeffer

It's interesting to read the notes from UnderCover collaborators here in the comments section. Contrary to some of your accusations, I wasn't expecting to see a bunch of Sabbath cover bands. I do write that the eclectic music styles were well advertised. And I have attended another UnderCover and enjoyed it -- because even though each song was arranged uniquely, the common thread of the album was there, jointing the tracks together. That's where Paranoid fell short. If you think I've missed the point, it's possible that it didn't come across as well as you hoped it would. In all fairness, maybe mine didn't either. I see people gripping to comments about mosh-pits and metalness and it's kind of like being pecked to death by chickens. Put simply, I went to the show with an open mind, and I didn't particularly like it. The observations about no headbanging were meant to illustrate that the audience, for the most part, was very bored. My only expectation was that it would be fun, and it wasn't. That said, it was an ambitious effort by many talented musicians. Actually I already said that in the story. If nothing else this project creates a great space for musicians by musicians, with 10+ instrument ensembles and all, however the audience's experience came second. Maybe the view was better from the stage.

 

 

 

LyzLuke
LyzLuke

Show aside.  I'm just curious.  Did you like the music?

Cornelius Boots
Cornelius Boots

You are correct: it was glorious from the stage, and this was due to the audience's reaction and the connection that was felt there.  Thank you audience! We love you.Specifically at this show, I felt waves from the audience that I have never felt in my last 30 years of performing, so it's a sort of irony for you to write this and an unexpected twist for me to reveal this personal experience in the midst of seemingly defending the positive reception of a show I helped manifest...how lame is that?!

It's like you were in a parallel dimension: I guess that's pretty cool in its own way, too.

I can dig your gripe about our hen-pecking the metal/non-metal thing but, uh, you did it again! Not headbanging=bored. Ergo, a bunch of bored-ass people screamed their heads off at the end (and sometimes the middle) of every song.  I am bummed that you were bored, but, the majority of the audience?  C'mon now...let's maintain some integrity here.

Please send all bored audience members (excluding people you knew before the show) my way and I will refund their ticket.

Jonzo
Jonzo

You obviously have no idea what real metal is. You think Sabbath is Metal?

Your expectations of the night were based on what exactly? -your knowledge of Sabbath? or your love of circle jerk know-it-alls? cause, last I checked San Francisco was full of culture, taste, freedom, and intelligence. If you expected versions of these timeless rock classics to be done with more distortion, double bass drum pedals, and a bunch of double time metal "tricks" ...go to Dayton, Ohio.

Sabbath cannot be done better than it was already done. Ever. You go out to see a "Sabbath Tribute Band" because you want to get as close to the original as you can. This night never intended to be a "tribute band", never advertised as such, and if the musicians were in it to out-do sabbaths intensity it would be disgusting and offensive.

This event was booked as 50 bay area musicians 'paying tribute' to sabbath in their own original way. ...um, thats kind of the whole thing with Undercover Presents.So, again, if you expected an all hesher night- go back to modesto

Vtbp
Vtbp

Everyone knows "tribute" bands don't get press...ha...got ya.....

Vtbp
Vtbp

 ps.. a great reviewer researches and describes the event to the best of their knowledge...then lets their audience form their own opinions..

Sandia
Sandia

 I am still reeling from the complete ambition of each one of these amazing artists. This show completely rocked. With shredders like Tiger Honeypot and the tight, heavy brass from The Extra Action Marching Band, I got my fill of metal lovers who gave a tribute. It wasn't your high school cover band. It was metal as fuck. 

Wally Scharold
Wally Scharold

First of all, I strongly suggest using the correct spelling of 'Megadeth' to even appear to have the kind of knowledge and understanding required to make such bold criticisms of this event.  That might help.

You have successfully perpetuated two stereotypes in this review: First, that metal involves little more than physical brutality and hand gestures symbolizing the devil (or the mascot for the University of Texas if you're into football...Hook 'em Horns!).  And second, that music journalism is nothing more than the futile practice of defining genres with the kind of strict regulation that blatantly contradicts the very freedom and rebellion rock n' roll *used* to celebrate.  Until, of course, it started getting enough attention (and made enough money) that someone had to go and write about it.

As a musician whose entire musical education is founded on learning Slayer, Metallica, Anthrax, and Megadeth songs from tab books as a teen, to going on to receiving multiple music degrees, learning to love and admire virtually all styles of music, I can't imagine a more appropriate tribute to the album that arguably gave birth to an entire genre.  That's what a tribute is all about, and -- minor technical qualms aside -- Cornelius Boots and UnderCover Presents pulled it off with grace and style.  I was honored to have been invited to participate.

Aaron Novik
Aaron Novik

"oy at ure ullshit aaaghhh ussies!" might be one of the worst attempts at trying to recreate a british accent in print form.  but judging from the rest of the article, english is not your strong suit.  i wonder who i should feel more ashamed for:  the person who wrote the completely inscrutable sentence "Despite how you feel about the outcome of each group they tribute, it's worth moving onto the next if the last try didn't suit you." (is tribute a verb here?  i'm not sure)  or the editor who didn't even notice that this wouldn't even pass through the 4th grade teacher's red pen treatment without looking like the bloody mosh pit this writer so strongly desired.  i guess proper sentence structure isn't metal enough for you.i heard lots of complaints about the lengths between songs and my response is this:  is 3 hours really too long for a night out listening to music?  who wants to go to a club to hang out and drink with friends for 40 minutes?  i understand the impatience, as we are a culture that feels slighted when an email takes more than 3 seconds to get delivered.  i think people should just be reassured that switching from a 10+ piece gamelan ensemble to an equally complicated shakuhachi quartet plus metal band takes a little TIME, and that the sound people are doing their job as quickly as possible.  

finally, the comments about it not being metal enough because there were no mosh pits has been extensively addressed, but i'd like to note that i was standing next to one of the biggest (and drunkest) skeptics of the show, and as Cornelius' epic "electric funeral" was winding down, some guy manages to whisper so the majority of people there could hear "this is so righteous."  the drunk skeptic turned around and said "it is!"  

  

testing
testing

SFWeekly, you should hire this guy to write for you, that first paragraph is pure gold.

LyzLuke
LyzLuke

Lyz Luke here, Executive Producer of UnderCover Presents.  Elizabeth, thank you for coming to the show and taking the time to review.  I've written a few articles for All Shook Down, and know what a tight turn around time you have and how you have to be honest and critical.  

However, I also know that you need to be diligent and read up on a performance before you do your write up.  I'm not sure if you've read the purpose of UnderCover, but the point is to try to showcase the Bay Area Music Community at large.  We work VERY hard on each bill to expose the audience to unexpected genres/takes on each song.  In a way, your article reflects that we did just that.  However, I don't think that you were aware that straying away from the original is the ENTIRE PURPOSE of this showcase.  

I take pride that our lineups have ranged from Afrobeat, 40 woman choirs, classical chamber, metal, Japanese, Latin, Jewish, Dub-Metal, and more.  I am also very honored to have been able to work with hundreds of the most talented artists in the city and to have been able to bridge the gaps between genres through this series.  While every singer on Saturday night wasn't metal, I think they were ridiculously talented in their respective genre.  

I stand by what I said about Cornelius Boots being one of the most demanding artists I've worked with.  He was that "hard teacher" in elementary school that I walked away from feeling that I learned the most.  In hind sight, that has always been my favorite teacher.  Hopefully the few hundred audience members walked away learning something new that forced them to think outside of a narrow scope.

I will admit, we should have edited down the interviews more.  Next time, we're going to keep it to 30 seconds or less.  The lengths worked well at the Nick Drake show, but it was a smaller venue (Rickshaw Stop) and people were able to see the screen better/hear the content.  Lesson learned for next time though.

For those who attended the show, I have one thing to say to you.

\m/

LyzLuke
LyzLuke

FYI...here's a video of Extra Action's rendition of War Pigs as captured by an audience member.  If you'll note, I do flash a little horn in my speech at the end.  ;)

http://vimeo.com/42594202 

pwrbttm
pwrbttm

The writer obviously missed the point of this whole show. 

Korntee
Korntee

pretty lame narrow minded review. It wasn't billed as a metal show.

SeanD
SeanD

I think the writer kinda misses the point about this - it was a reinterpretation not a note-for-note cover. I had a blast - when the performers were performing. 

The breaks between songs were not my favorite (though I did find myself buying more beer) but whoever thought that showing videos of  performers explaining their love of Sabbath and the Bay Area music scene was a good idea really needs to rethink that: It was incredibly narcissistic and it insulted the audience.  We already paid $20 (and got a CD to boot with all the band info) so stop selling it! Provide an experience and just stop talking. It really bummed me out, though I'll give them a chance when they do another  album that interests me.

Cornelius Boots
Cornelius Boots

I guess the idea that a brutal metal show of Sabbath covers would be a creative or unique thing never occurred to me. There's lots of that out there. If your day-world consciousness considers the Underworld to be all about violence and brutality (or mosh-pits, which are fun at any rate) , that's a shallow perspective. The chthonic perspective is a death-consciousness that usually eludes our waking egos: it exudes from depths that often speak in inverted images and it is in this spirit that several of the song-alchemists involved in this show operated. In brief: I love Sabbath (and I enjoy a great deal of extreme metal) but the heaviness they created translates into my life as depth and awareness, not -isms, cliches, posturing or brutality, which is what you seemed to have hoped for from the show.I'm not saying it's the only way it can be done, but for those willing to take this kind of descent with us, we have all emerged with much more than just ringing ears, bruised shins and cheap beer and sweat-soked Slipknot t-shirts which it seems is your vision of a post-"underworld" experience. As someone that seems to be equating Ozzy and Sabbath as synonymous, I suppose it's easy to see how this journey we took was not a good fit for you. I hope Mayhem does a note-for-note cover of Bark at the Moon real soon and gives you the show you hoped for.

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