Umami Burger Releases $65 Truffle Burger

UMAMI.jpg
Umami Burger
If money ain't a thang, then this burger is calling yo' name.
Just when we thought $13 for a burger was steep, Umami Burger in the SoMa went and released its M.N.O. (Money's No Object) burger as part of its annual truffle menu.
Along with the slew of high rises breaking ground near the waterfront end of the SoMa, the $65 M.N.O. is breaking new ground on burger prices. But if money ain't a thang, then this burger is callin' yo name.

The American staple that was once considered an inexpensive meal has been put on a whole new pedestal with Bryan Flannery Wagyu Beef, a port reduction, and freshly shaved white truffles.The M.N.O. is available Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays in December at the King Street location (242 King).



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42 comments
Melody Bailing
Melody Bailing

That looks disgusting, I wouldn't even pay $5 for that

Darryl Manco
Darryl Manco

Yuck! Hate the earthy taste of truffles. Keep it.

Conrad Seeto
Conrad Seeto

I'd try it. I'd prefer to not have to pay that much. In fact, if someone else picked up the check, that would be great.

Wilson Linker
Wilson Linker

Nah their regular burgers aren't all that... And too much truffle is groddy.

Javier Leocadio Colón
Javier Leocadio Colón

For $65... I can cook my own burger and enjoy a bottle of good bourbon with desert.

Heather Wynne
Heather Wynne

And P.s. It taste good. TO ME. Justin Jacobs

Out Ofthe Blue
Out Ofthe Blue

Yuppie Dot.Com wankers will eat it up... Rest of us will Laugh !!

Michael Harms
Michael Harms

Just hit up Oola and eat their burger and call It day. Oh plus still have money on your person

Heather Wynne
Heather Wynne

Sorry but us poor people can only afford truffle oil. Some people are snobs

Porsche Elizabeth
Porsche Elizabeth

I was about to send this to you Rosie Flash lol but saw you commented

Brent Wong
Brent Wong

I've had the normal burger it's good but wouldn't pay $65 for the ultimate unless the company bough me one. Then again it's in the Marin I'm sure some Marina d-bag is going use his business credit card and write it off.

Michael Harms
Michael Harms

Oolas burger with truffle oil is a dream for the right price. That's the way

Justin Jacobs
Justin Jacobs

For some reason, back in the '90s, truffle oil became an acceptable—even desirable—ingredient for chefs to use. Coming in at a fraction of the cost of real truffles (which vary year to year, but generally run in the thousands-of-dollars-per-ounce range), it seemed like an easy way to add some truffle aroma to an otherwise boring dish. Problem is, truffle oil isn't even made from truffles. It's made from an organic compound called 2,4-Dithiapentane—derived either naturally or from a petroleum base—mixed together with olive oil. Sure, that happens to be the most prevalant chemical odorant in real truffles, but using truffle oil is the culinary equivalent of dousing a custard with, say, artificial vanilla flavoring, or making soup from a chicken bouillon cube—worse, even. At least bouillon cubes usually start with real chicken. Can you think of a single great chef who'd dream of using such artificial flavorings in their food? So what made truffle oil different? A lot of it was the caché of the name. As fine dining became more mainstream, more and more ordinary folks started hearing about what truffles were, about their extraordinary scent, and the extraordinary cost associated with them. Truffle oil was a quick, easy, and cheap way to give em a taste. Since back in those days, most people had no idea what a truffle was supposed to taste like, chefs seeing the dollar signs, thought to themselves, "what's the harm in pulling one over on a couple of rubes?" Most likely, many of these chefs had never even tasted real truffles themselves. And it worked! For many many years, diners—either legitimately tricking themselves into liking the flavor of the fake stuff, or more likely, not wanting to appear uncultured when they claimed not to like truffles—simply put up with it. I know many diners these days who swear up and down the line that they simply don't like truffles, despite the fact that most of them have never even tasted a real truffle. It's like saying, "I can't stand fruit" after having been raised only eating Jolly Ranchers. So what? What's the problem?, you might say. Even if it doesn't taste like truffles, as long as it tastes good, who cares? Well, here's what I have to say to that: It doesn't taste good. It bears a passing resemblance to truffles at first whiff, but it quickly devolves into metallic, gasoline-scented notes, particularly at the concentrations that chefs seemed to use it in in the '90s. That diners actually put up with the stuff for as long as they did is perhaps one of the greatest examples of mass pyschosomosis in history. Fortunately, most diners and chefs these days have come to realize it, and truffle oil is becoming more and more scarce. I chatted with a couple of chefs who went through the truffle mill in the '90s about their current thoughts on the matter. Michael Anthony, of New York's Gramercy Tavern is diplomatic about the issue, saying that "I decided a number of years ago to stop using truffle oils. Once or twice a year, usually for New Year's Eve, we create a blow out menu which will include fresh truffles. They are a rare, expensive treat and it only seems sensible to celebrate them by tasting the real thing."

Steve Manciet
Steve Manciet

No! I would rather buy a $5.00 burger and donate $60.00 to a soup kitchen.

Dave Carreon
Dave Carreon

Nah, I'm good... I don't think warren buffet would find that a good investment either.

Jon Wollenhaupt
Jon Wollenhaupt

Evidence dot.com insanity V2 has taken over the Bay Area.

JD Sparks
JD Sparks

no, and you should be slapped for wasting your money that way.

Timothy Smith
Timothy Smith

Try it? Sure. Pay $65 for a burger (of any type)? Never.

James Pawlish
James Pawlish

Got one yesterday! Anyone second guessing needs to drop the cash and taste amazingness.

Dustin Kane
Dustin Kane

Best thing Umami makes is cheese tots.

Tyler Boshard
Tyler Boshard

No, because umami burger is absolutely terrible. Worst burger I've had in years.

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